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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
a republican to of the science union over antagonism. then we can could see any republican future beyond the border. he did later on. as for the unity of the triumph of the republican party since the inception seward had been a major spokesmen for anti-slavery number weighed this from the irrepressible conflict and had to rappel from the assault on the left and the party asking for compromise did even if the most radical did vote they would offset the loss. sell it would become the great union party and as i said lincoln did turn that party etfs before the hostilities did not. yes he viewed the crisis from the partisan perspective but there was the third fundamental reason. the evidence suggests the visceral hatred of slavery. seward without question never gave slavery equality with free them but convinced with the rapid expansion of the free states with burgeoning economic power this overpowers slavery. to become casualties of what he foresaw as inevitable progress after accomplishing his purpose elected a republican seward was quite willing to stop. not selling 10. the territorial issu
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go, president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy, that's not change.
the science of polling. >> or the number of times i have refused to pick up my phone when i can see it's research firm. but nonetheless, i think a nightmare frankly, maybe we can all agree on this, there are some electoral college/popular vote difference. >> one scenario is that it just doesn't come down to one state, like ohio, is that you got four, five states and each one of those five is in that circumstance and we're in total confusion. >> we have december 31st coming up. >> you talk about ohio, they don't even count all of the absentee votes in ohio until november 16th. it will take longer than that for the provisional votes. you talked about polls. last time around, our abc news/washington posthad president obama's dead-on. 53%. now romney at 49%. talk about the possibility that romney wins the popular vote and loses the electoral. >> in 52 presidential elections the popular vote and the electoral have con insided john quincy adams. hayes in '76. bush over gore in 2000. that's not a bad record. 52 out of 56. i wouldn't worry about it so much. >> or 2 out of 3. >> i think 2000 wa
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. flavor, meet food. it's time for swanson flavor boost. concentrated broth in easy to use packets. mix it into skillet dishes, for an instant dose of... hell-o! [ female announcer ] get recipes at flavorboost.com. >> bret: the worst of the storm has passed in the northeast. now comes the clean-up. and the rebuild. all of that takes time. material and money. chief washington correspondent james rosen looks at the relief efforts. >> it's going to be a very large response to covering multiple states. the biggest thing i'm concerned about is the power outals. >> it's not home. but it's been made pretty comfortable for us. the national guard and the red cross here have been super. >> james and kimberly levine joined by the dogs were among the 650 delaware residents who took refuge monday night in seven shelters. the american red cross operates across the first state. this, the del mar station is special needs facility, offering not only a lively kennel, but emotional counselors,
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. tohange comes when we live up america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will make us less dependent on foreign oil. that is
and development money that comes from nih, the national science foundation. i would take issue with the fact that the republic of texas is making it all on their own they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i have no problem with that at all. ilt to benefit from the oriole history and such a profound way, we do not have that everywhere. but they do benefit from nasa and the national institute of health. and that is helped to spur their economy as well. host: a question on twitter -- why did obama not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions and the auto bailout. guest: that is an urban legend. we are working very hard to help the delphi unions and other unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw, iucwa to the development of the new general motors. but, this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as well as other unions had. so there are many salaried people, delphi salaried folks that say this is the president picking the unions over the
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
undecided voters. so what should they do? larry sabato is the professor of political science at the university of virginia. he joins us now. we have a week left. i think we just got note that president obama will resume campaigning, according to aides, in nevada, colorado, wisconsin, tomorrow. is this a smart thing? is this what he should be doing? >> well, look, the storm has served as a circuit breaker on the campaign. it's like we have to restart all over again and the candidates, both of them, have to whip up enthusiasm again among the base. it's amazing how quickly people's attention will turn to something else. i think everybody can do that. everybody knows the election is next tuesday. the stakes are very high. so look, we have to get back to campaigning. there is no question about it. it's big election. >> eric: what about for mitt romney? he stepped aside. he said, i'm not going to campaign. he even stopped fundraising. said send the money to fema or emergency assistance instead. when is it time for mitt romney to really start bearing down again on the campaign? >> w
of marriage. it is not what got a design. and that is what we focus on is using the social science. what that shows is what society for centuries has followed in the judeo-christian teaching is actually right. if you want to have a successful happy prosperous relationship and the family and marriage, you preserve yourself until marriage, you abstain from sexual relations, you enjoy that married relationship, you produce children, you raise them in that environment where they are loving and there's a commitment between the mother and the father. and expose them to the religious teachings. in the evidence is overwhelming. a better emotionally, educationally, economically. i understand, that is not, everybody has not had that opportunity. and we need to reach an as a community, in particular reaching out and helping those that do not have that benefit. we should never take our policies and change them away from what we should be aspiring to be. and the best environment for a child, bar none, is with their biological mother and father who are in a lifelong marriage relationship, those childr
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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